the obamas new washington homeThe Obama’s have picked out their first post-presidential home: a $5.3 million house in Washington, D.C.’s historic Kalorama neighborhood.

President Barack Obama, along with First Lady Michelle Obama, their daughters Sasha and Malia, and Michelle’s mother, will be moving into the 8,200-square-foot home on January 20, 2017, when their time as America’s first family comes to a close.

The gorgeous 1928 brick Tudor boasts nine bedrooms and eight and a half bathrooms. The residence comes complete with two gourmet kitchens, a home gym, and a personal office. Other extravagant amenities include a large reception area, a fireplace, a wet bar, a butler’s pantry, a wine cellar, and an oversized terrace ornamented by formal gardens and a large courtyard.

The home, which the Obamas will be leasing, is owned by former White House press secretary Joe Lockhart, who is now serving as executive vice president of communications for the NFL.

This hot piece of property is nestled within a short distance to many others in Washington’s elite circles. The neighborhood was also home to former Presidents Woodrow Wilson, after his time as President, and Franklin Delano Roosevelt, while he served as secretary of the Navy. Former President Bill Clinton and former Secretary of State (and current Presidential candidate) Hillary Clinton live nearby just off of Embassy Row.

President Obama's future office? Image Source: Washington Fine Properties, LLC

President Obama’s future office? Image Source: Washington Fine Properties, LLC

Though other former presidents have chosen to relocate further away from Washington, D.C., upon retirement, the Obamas have chosen to stay in the area so that their youngest daughter can finish high school at Sidwell Friends School, where she is currently enrolled.

“Transferring someone in the middle of high school? Tough,” said President Obama.

Real estate website Zillow estimates that the monthly rent of the Obama’s new property could cost up to $22,000. Security analysts suggest that the leased home may also require some additional updates before the family can move in. Changes may include expensive bulletproof windows and doors.

Being a historic home, it is hard to say what sort of updates have been made already, and what other improvements are still in the works to make the home safe enough for a former president. For instance, a typical metal roof is more durable and can last up to seven times longer than a roof made of asphalt shingles, but historic homes typically have restrictions on what rennovations are allowed. Of course, not many 1920s homes were built with bulletproof glass, which will be essential to protect such a high-profile family.