Political commentator/author Ann Coulter speaks onstage at The Comedy Central Roast of Rob Lowe at Sony Studios on August 27, 2016 in Los Angeles, California. The Comedy Central Roast of Rob Lowe will premiere on September 5, 2016 at 10:00 p.m. ET/PT.

Political commentator/author Ann Coulter speaks onstage at The Comedy Central Roast of Rob Lowe at Sony Studios on August 27, 2016 in Los Angeles, California. The Comedy Central Roast of Rob Lowe will premiere on September 5, 2016 at 10:00 p.m. ET/PT.

*Ann Coulter tried to pick up the pieces and move on from her participation in the “Comedy Central Roast of Rob Lowe,” which at some point turned into the Comedy Central Roast of Ann Coulter.

At Saturday’s taping, the conservative political commentator took jabs, uppercuts and roundhouse rights from her fellow roasters – from being called a “racist c**t” and a scarecrow by “Saturday Night Live’s” Pete Davidson, to being told she looks like a horse from Peyton Manning.

The Hollywood Reporter followed up with Coulter for a post-mortem Q&A, where she tried to spin the experience as one of uninspired jokes from a dais full of “has-beens.”

Read excerpts below:

How did it come about that you were invited to a roast of Rob Lowe?

No idea — it showed up on my book publicity schedule.

How well do you know Lowe?

Not well. I’ve met him before.

When did this devolve into a roast of you instead of Lowe?

It began with the Comedy Central interview on the red carpet. I did at least a half-dozen interviews and everyone else asked me normal questions — about Lowe, whether I’d seen a roast before, the book and Donald Trump. Only Comedy Central’s interviewer went on and on about the KKK, sheets, burning crosses, David Duke and other really cutting edge, original stuff like that.

Why do you think it became a roast of you?

I have no idea, but it probably has something to do with Comedy Central’s corporate decision to move away from comedy — which is paying huge dividends with the Larry Wilmore and Trevor Noah shows.

There were some pretty mean jokes about you, weren’t there?

I don’t notice “mean,” but I do notice “jokes” and I didn’t hear many of those — until I took the mic!

Did Peyton Manning call you a horse, or did I misunderstand that joke?

Wow, you must not be followed by any boring, unoriginal people on Twitter. Half-brights consider it comedy gold to congratulate anyone they dislike for “winning the Kentucky Derby!” The only thing more bracingly original to not-smart people is: “stay classy!”

What’s up with all the jokes about you dying?

I’m sure there are lots of funny jokes about people dying. These weren’t those.

I thought violent rhetoric was off limits. That what I heard after Sarah Palin put a target on a map, anyway.

People are too thin-skinned. My only rule about a joke is that it should be funny.

Which of the jokes that night offended you?

Nothing offends me. “Bored me” is a different story.

Do you get along with these folks? Did you talk to any of them about what they said about you?

I don’t know any of them. I’d never heard of any of them except Eli Manning [a reference to Peyton Manning] and Jewel — and Spade and Lowe, of course, though I’ve never seen any of their movies.

Is the press portraying this event properly, from your perspective?

I’m not sure, but I wish everyone could see the full roast, unedited. You guys at The Hollywood Reporter have pull. Can you get the unedited version and put it up online? Also: tip to reporters based on the Variety review. You ought to get these new things they have called “tape recorders” so you don’t murder peoples’ jokes with your crappy paraphrases.

Who wrote your jokes?

Me and some of my friends, including the magnificent joke writer Ned Rice. Ross Bennett told me to start with the bit about my book, since that was the only reason I was doing it. (I’ll do garage radio when I’m promoting a book.) I couldn’t use much of what was given to me by the network because of Comedy Central’s decision to shift away from humor.

You think you will do another one of these?

Only if I’ve just published a book and if the other roasters are more successful at whatever it is they do. It’s invariably the has-beens and wanna-bes who think it’s a good career move to attack Ann Coulter. Successful people — even committed lefties — are always perfectly lovely to me: Tim Robbins, Dave Matthews, Andy Dick and on and on and on. I used to dread going on Politically Incorrect with “up and coming” comedians. But at least on Politically Incorrect, there would be just one has-been or wanna-be on the panel. This was an entire dais of ‘em.

 

“The Comedy Central Roast of Rob Lowe” airs on Labor Day.