Actress Kaitlin Doubleday attends FOX 2016 Upfront Arrivals at Wollman Rink, Central Park on May 16, 2016 in New York City.

Actress Kaitlin Doubleday attends FOX 2016 Upfront Arrivals at Wollman Rink, Central Park on May 16, 2016 in New York City.

*“Empire” star Kaitlin Doubleday, whose character Rhonda was last seen flirting with death in the season 2 cliffhanger, finds herself “something of a minority among minorities,” as described by TV Guide, referring to her presence as the lone white woman among a predominantly black cast.

“It’s been really eye opening,” she told TVGuide.com of the experience in a phone interview earlier this year. “It’s a sad time for many reasons,” she said, including the fact that Donald Trump, whom she called a bully and a racist, is the GOP nominee. “I don’t see my country in the same way.”

Doubleday says she feels lucky to be in a position to hear real talk among the other cast members about racial topics. “I have been a fly on the wall, with people speaking as if I wasn’t there. It’s been interesting to be part of the conversation [about race and diversity] among black people.”

Coincidentally, this experience isn’t entirely foreign for her: She was the only white person on her cheerleading squad in her freshman year of high school.

“Because of the way I grew up, in L.A. public schools, I’m really comfortable around other cultures. I never paid much attention [to being the only white person], which is a naive white-privileged thing to say. But I never felt a divide.

“I did grow up in a white privileged way; I didn’t think that many people were racist. I’m 31; I should have known that a long time ago. I just wanted to believe racism was just… drunk idiots in the middle of nowhere. What I’ve learned is that, on both sides, there is a ton of prejudice and assumptions about how the other side feels.”

She’s embracing what she’s learning, and relishing the moment. “I feel lucky that I get to be part of conversations that most white people wouldn’t get to hear. I’m proud ‘Empire’ is paving the way for other shows — for black, Asian, Hispanic and people other than white getting cast; it’s unbelievable. I talk about it with my friends all the time: how lucky that I got the one white role on the biggest show on TV.”