*A small collection of protesters recently gathered outside of the Weller Street Missionary Baptist Church (Los Angeles), where former reality television personality and ordained minister Omarosa Manigault delivered a surprisingly well-crafted sermon.

As part of the church’s black history month program, she opened her message with off-the-cuff remarks about some of yesteryear’s most esteemed African American heroes and innovators. It wasn’t long before she gained complete control of the room.

“Madam CJ Walker set the stage for career driven women like myself to achieve tremendous success in a male-dominated world,” she explained to the audience. “[Walker] single-handedly revolutionized the hair care industry. Let’s keep it real, what woman in this audience hasn’t used a straightening comb? Who hasn’t used hair relaxer? As black women, we use our hair to express who we are and how we feel. [Walker’s] inventions help to keep us looking and feeling fabulous.”

Manigault entered the sanctuary at roughly 9:45am. Like a politician on the campaign trail, she flashed a smile to everyone in attendance, shook a few outstretched hands, and was escorted to her seat in the pulpit, where she dropped to her knees for a moment of individual prayer. By 10:15 am, after hyping up the crowd with a series of animated gestures and bombastic language, a heavy sheen of perspiration began to spread across her face, causing it to glow.

Manigault’s sermon came on the heels of a very public feud between she and veteran journalist April Ryan, and it concluded her eight-year-run as assistant pastor of Weller Street church, a role that she accepted after acquiring her ministerial license. Ryan claims that Manigault “physically intimidated” and “threatened” her during a heated argument outside the Oval Office that “could have warranted intervention by the Secret Service,” according to a report. This allegation is still being investigated by authorities, but it didn’t seem to put a damper on Manigault’s cheerful mood. With a glint of pride, and jubilation, in her eyes, she broke the news of her engagement to pastor John Allen Newman, who proposed to her in front of his congregation last year in July.

“In the next few days, I’ll be relocating to Jacksonville [Florida], where my fiancé pastors a church,” she explained to everyone. “The Bible says that when a man finds a wife, he finds a good thing. That’s certainly true. But how about when a woman finds a good man? Trust me — it’s a great thing. I’m truly blessed to have a wonderful, God-fearing life partner. I’m moving on with him to start the next chapter of my life.”
“I also have a new job. It’s kind of demanding,” she added.

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With the polish of a seasoned public speaker, Manigault’s verbal prowess was on full display as she calmly and eloquently used scripture to captivate her audience. The Howard University graduate also touched on her less-than-desirable reputation as one of America’s most despised female celebrities, a burden that stems from her controversial antics and icy demeanor while she was a contestant on NBC’s ongoing series “The Apprentice.”

“I will always have a friend in God,” she declared as tears streamed down her cheeks. “He has given me strength and everlasting peace. So when people talk about me, when they drag my name through the mud, I’m empowered by God’s love and his promise to never leave or forsake me.

“I’ve been chosen to represent the highest office in American politics,” she added. “It’s a privilege, an honor, and a blessing from above. God is truly working overtime in my life.”

Later that evening, Manigault returned to Washington where she is serving as the director of communications for President Donald Trump, a role that many critics believe was offered to her undeservedly. It’s still too early to determine whether she is qualified to work in the White House, as we have only entered the second official month of Trump’s presidency. However, one thing’s for sure, if she falls short of success (and that’s a huge “if”), it won’t be due to a poor work ethic or lack of ambition.