*Note to parents who are sending young children off to school, teachers have got your number. And not in the they can call you anytime way; more so in the behavior department.

They know when it was you, not the child, who really completed that project. They realize too that when you are all up in their face complaining that you had no idea the field trip was on Friday, its because you haven’t been reading the letters they’ve been sending home with the child all month long.

Teachers continue to voice their frustrations in staff meetings and principals offices because obviously, trying to speak to parents, words often fall on deaf ears.

So in an attempt to help them out, here is 6 things they SO wish you would stop doing…pretty please.

  1. If a child asks for help, find ways to be their assistant while allowing them to connect to the task as much as possible.”–Signed, your child’s teacher

Teachers say there is a marked difference in the behavior of a child who has contributed to his or her own project. This versus the child who had absolutely nothing to do with it. DON’T DO YOUR CHILD’S HOMEWORK FOR THEM!

“We can tell the difference between something made by the parents and something made by the children—call it a trick of the trade. The proudest, most connected kids are the ones who actually did the project themselves, with wonky letters crawling up the sides of the page and half glued-in photographs with the tops of people’s heads missing. They light up as they share their work, whereas the children who didn’t contribute wear glazed expressions.”

Read more at EURThisNthat.